Reading Nii Ayikwei Parkes' novel Tail of the Blue Bird in Ghana

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The three Ghana librarians and coordinator Paul Ayutoliya are reading Nii Ayikwei Parkes novel Tail of the Blue Bird.  Here is Paul's summary of their discussion of the next chapter, as they work their way through the novel.

P1070022.JPGIn our discussions, we saw that the novel is written in what the Ghanaian man called pidgin English, Twi and the real English language. This writing fits in the Ghanaian culture as most Ghanaian speak pidgin English. Combining this languages make the discussion of the novel more interesting. This write up represents our discussions of the novel from where we stop to Yawda. We discovered in our discussions that the village where this thing (human remains) under Kofi Atta's hut that was first discovered by the indecent dressing girl who was a girl friend to the minister of roads and highway, following the deployment of the police by their inspector who receives this instruction also from one sector minister (the road and highway minister), the drunk pathologist from Koforidua and then to the arrival of Kayo is called Sonokrom.   P1070044.JPGSonokrom can be described as a village where the people who live there speaks and understand the language of the forest; they live by the tradition of their ancestors. They are use to tales. Western knowledge was something strange in the land of Sonokrom, worthy of note, the people of this village do not play or joke with palm wine especially Opanyin Poku.  The discovery of that thing (possibly human remains) found in Kofi Atta's hut brought or introduces some modern day knowledge (book knowledge) unto the people of Sonokrom.

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FAVL Blog

Books, reading, and libraries relevant to Africa by Michael Kevane, co-Director of FAVL and economist at Santa Clara University.

Other contributors include Kate Parry, FAVL-East Africa director, FAVL Burkina Faso representative Koura Donkoui, FAVL Burkina Faso program manager Krystle Nanema, and FAVL friends Emilie Crofton and Elisee Sare.

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